Brisinger

Book Summary:

Following the colossal battle against the Empire’s warriors on the Burning Plains, Eragon and his dragon, Saphira, have narrowly escaped with their lives. Still there is more at hand for the Rider and his dragon, as Eragon finds himself bound by a tangle of promises he may not be able to keep.First is Eragon’s oath to his cousin Roran: to help rescue Roran’s beloved, Katrina, from King Galbatorix’s clutches. But Eragon owes his loyalty to others, too. The Varden are in desperate need of his talents and strength—as are the elves and dwarves. When unrest claims the rebels and danger strikes from every corner, Eragon must make choices— choices that take him across the Empire and beyond, choices that may lead to unimagined sacrifice.

Eragon is the greatest hope to rid the land of tyranny. Can this once-simple farm boy unite the rebel forces and defeat the king?

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  1. Paolini is a good story teller, if a bit wordy (784 pages worth, with another volume coming!) and he writes in an exciting, adventuresome way. However, I will agree with Ed that the opening scene of cultic rites is both disturbing and completely unnecessary to the plot. Furthermore, the language, while not terrible, has some problems. Paolini seems fixated on the euphemism “blast it” and calling people “bas**ards.” There are other references to cursing and swearing, though few actual curse or swear words are used that I recall, as well as to drinking alcohol, praying to pagan gods, bawdy jokes, and smoking. Worst of all, Katrina, the fiancée of Eragon’s cousin Roran, has become pregnant out of wedlock, and while Roran hurries up the marriage to “save her honor,” the whole situation is looked upon as rather amusing by others, especially Eragon. The entire book was a disappointment to me, and as a result, I just have a hard time recommending it as something that would be of much interest to godly minded people, especially youngsters whose parents want them to grow up with a righteous attitude.

  2. […] her free time teaching herself how to write fantasy. She hopes to make a career of this much like Christopher Paolini […]

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